Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies


Thyroid peroxidase antibodies

Let’s get to know all this important information about Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies in the following article.

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies
Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies

About the examination

Screening type: Thyroid peroxidase antibodies

Sample: Full blood

Unit of measurement: g/dL

Thyroid peroxide body test is a laboratory examination in which the level of thyroid peroxide antibodies is determined in the blood. Thyroid peroxide is one of the most important enzymes secreted by the thyroid gland and essentially contributes to the secretion of thyroid hormones. Peroxidase is the most vulnerable to attack by antibodies, as these bodies disrupt the ability of thyroid peroxidase to use iodine in the formation of thyroid hormones, which can lead to thyroid inactivity.

These antibodies that attack thyroid peroxide lead to inflammation, which can destroy some or all of the thyroid cells, as well as the appearance of a mass (node) or an enlarged thyroid cell. The appearance of thyroid antibodies in the body usually coincides with conditions such as premature birth or Hashimoto’s disease, where the body is immune, causing the thyroid gland to be affected.

Although thyroid antibodies have been present in the body for a period of time, their effect on thyroid stimulating hormone levels may require a longer period of appearance, as it is common in many cases to maintain thyroid hormone levels within their normal rates for up to months or even years before thyroid inactivity is diagnosed, although laboratory tests show positive results indicating the presence of thyroid antibodies during the period prior to diagnosis.

Thyroid antibody screening is part of a larger and more comprehensive examination called thyroid antibody screening, which includes, in addition to thyroid prooxides, antibodies to thyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies to thyroid receptor receptors.

Examination of anti-peroxide peroxide and pregnancy

If you have a thyroid disease, the disease usually intensifies when a woman has a pregnancy, which can put both the mother and the fetus at risk. Therefore, it is usually recommended to examine antibodies to the thyroid gland, including thyroid biroxida, as early detection of thyroid disease and appropriate treatment during pregnancy helps to maintain the health of both the mother and the fetus.

This test is used to diagnose

Your doctor usually requests an antibody examination of thyroid peroxide in case of suspicion of one of the autoimmune diseases that may affect the functioning of the thyroid gland in addition to some other medical conditions, as cases where the levels of thyroid peroxidase are high include:

1. Hashimoto’s disease, where thyroid peroxidase levels rise in more than 90% of such cases, and people with this disease usually experience some symptoms, most notably:

  • Weight gain.
  • Fatigue.
  • Hair loss.
  • Inability to withstand cold temperatures.
  • Irregular menstrual cycle in females.
  • Constipation.
  • Depression.
  • Joint pain.

2. Graves’ disease, where levels of thyroid peroxide antibodies are high at about 50%-80% of such cases, and people with the disease usually experience some symptoms, most notably:

  • Weight loss.
  • plaster in the eyes.
  • shivering in the hands.
  • Inability to sleep deeply.
  • Tension.
  • An increase in the speed of the heartbeat.
  • Thyroid bloating.

3. Some other autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, and others.

4. Multi-node toxic thyroid hypertrophy (polycolate peach).

5. If there is a complex in the thyroid gland.

6. Thyroid cancer.


How the test is performed

The test is done by taking a blood sample intravenously, as the sample is placed in a tube and sent to the laboratory to measure the levels of all anti-thyroid bodies in the body.

Some medications can affect the results of the examination of thyroid peroxide antibodies, so it is recommended to consult your doctor and inform them of the type of medications, vitamins and herbs that are frequently taken.

It is recommended to inform your doctor if you are pregnant, as the results of the examination are likely to differ from normal rates in such cases.

Interpretation of the results of the examination

The diagnosis of some cases depends on the results of more than one type of antibody as follows:

In the absence of antibodies to the thyroid gland, the cause of symptoms or gland problems is not the result of an immune system malfunction.


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If the level of any thyroid peroxide or thyroglobulin protein antibodies is high, it is often the result of Hashimoto’s disease.

If the level of antibodies to thyroid-activated hormone receptors is high, it is more likely to be caused by Graves’ disease.

The higher the thyroid antibody readings, the more likely it is that the cause is an imbalance in the immune system.

AntibodiesNormal
Anti-thyroid peroxide bodies (TPOAb)Less than 35 IU per milliliter
Anti-thyroglobulin (TgAb)Less than 20 IU per milliliter
Anti-thyroid-oriented antibodies (TSI)Less than 140% of core activity
Thyroid stimulating hormone receptors (TSH) associated with TBII/TRAb immunosuppressants1.75 IU per litre or less

Antibodies are directed against three primary thyroid antigens:

  • Tharoglobulin: Anti-thyroglobulin (TgAb) bodies.
  • Thyroid peroxide peroxide (microsoum antigen): antipyrcosametic bodies (TPOAb).
  • Thyroid stimulating hormone receptors (TSH): Antibodies to thyroid-guided hormone receptors (TRAb).

The appearance of anti-thyroid objects in the blood usually indicates an autoimmune disorder in the thyroid gland, but high levels of these bodies may also appear in other health conditions.

The following cases result in high levels of antibodies in the blood

 Hashimoto’s disease is associated byGraves’ disease is associated byDuring pregnancy is associated byOther autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes are associated byOther diseases are associated by
Antipyrkys (TPOAb) antibodies  90%-100%  50%-80%  14%  40%  Multi-nodule hyperthyroidism, segregated thyroid nodes and thyroid cancer.
Anti-thyroglobulin (TgAb)80%-90%50%-70%  14%  40%  Multi-nodule hyperthyroidism, segregated thyroid nodes and thyroid cancer.
Anti-thyroid antibodies (TSI)15%80%-90% if the patient is not treated  Multi-nocolular toxic thyroid hypertrophy 15%  
Thyrotropin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII)15%80%-90% if the patient is not treated   
These cases result in high levels of antibodies in the blood

Relatives of people with autoimmune thyroid disorder may experience a 40% to 50% increase in tpoab levels of antipyrcosax, or high levels of antipyrcosmic body levels (TgAb).

Or the following conditions may be associated with high levels of antipyroxide (TPOAb) in the blood:

  • Hashimoto’s disease (90%-100%).
  • Graves’ disease (50%-80%).
  • Other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (40%).
  • During pregnancy (14%).

Multi-nodule hyperthyroidism, segregated thyroid nodes and thyroid cancer.

Relatives of people with autoimmune thyroid disorder may experience 40% to 50% of the high levels of antipyrcosade (TPOAb).

The following conditions are associated with high levels of anti-tyroglobulin (TgAb) in the blood:

  • Hashimoto’s disease (80%-90%).
  • Graves’ disease (50%-70%).
  • Other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (40%).
  • During pregnancy (14%).

Multi-nodule hyperthyroidism, segregated thyroid nodes and thyroid cancer.

Relatives of people with autoimmune thyroid disorder may experience 40% to 50% of the high levels of antipyroxis (TgAb).

The following conditions are associated with high levels of anti-thyroid-guided antibodies (TSI) in the blood:

  • Graves’ disease (80%-90% if the patient is not treated).
  • Multi-nodule toxic thyroid hyperthyroidism (15%).

The following conditions are also associated with high levels of Thyrotropin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) in the blood:

  • Graves’ disease (more than 90% in cases not treated).
  • Hashimoto’s disease (15%).

Normal value

Female: Less than 9

Male: Less than 9


Reasons for high reading

Graves’ disease
Thyroid disease hashemoto

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NB: This pharmaceutical information does not preclude a doctor or pharmacist visit. We do not recommend any medication without medical consultation.

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